techniques and elements project

Art Quilts 2-4

Quilt number 1, 3D applique quilt do more was actually made before I decided to use a combination of three methods on one piece. I’m going to use it as the cover for the first of two art quilt journals. Here is a link with some background information on how this project metamorphosed.

Project art quilt samplers 2-4:

2) enso love

“enso love”
applique, batting, block printing

Warm n’ Natural low loft batting
Lumiere – pearl turquoise
Golden Fluid Acrylic – black
Open Circle Brushstroke wood block
Cotton fabric scraps
Cotton thread – black
Foam paint brush
Foam make-up wedge

The quilt top is painted batting stamped with a wood block dabbed with acrylic paint. Three little rectangle scrap appliques were unevenly placed to give a sense of movement. It’s actually only two layers, batting and backing so I’m not sure if it’s technically a quilt. I cheated a little there.

Tips:  When using a wood block with a fast drying acrylic paint, push down firmly on the block but only hold it down for a few seconds so that it doesn’t get stuck to the surface. The paint should be cleaned off of the block as soon as possible using a mild soap and warm water.

3)water lily moon

“water lily moon”
burning, clay, collagraphy

Lutradur
Dynaflow – chartreuse, teal
Gesso – white
Felt batting
Modena Soft Air Dry Polymer Clay
Rubber moon face mold
Cardboard
Elmer’s glue
Golden Polymer Medium (Gloss)
Cotton thread – variegated
Heat gun
Walnut Hollow Versa Tool

The quilt top is lutradur and was painted with a light wash of colors. Placed on top of a gesso filled collagraphy plate. After it dried, I put the Lutradur on a sheet of glass and cut out the triangular shapes around the lily using the Versa Tool. Placed it on top of the felt batting and free motion stitched along the faint lines of the design created with the plate. If I had used thicker cardboard, the glued down shapes would have produced a more prominent design and it would have been easier to trace with the stitching — or perhaps if I had added some rich color to the gesso, that may have made a difference as well.

The heat gun created the lacy holes in the Lutradur and the felt. I held it about 8-12 inches away from the fabric and kept it moving in a circular random type motion. I assembled the quilt before hand stitching the clay moon face on the top. In retrospect, I should have added the clay piece before adding the backing. All hand stitched embellishment work should be done before the quilt sandwich is assembled so that the stitches are hidden under the backing unless the preference is for the stitching to actually show.

Tips:  When using any heat tool or any mediums, use proper ventilation and/or a mask as a safety precaution. Use all safety measures at all times. I don’t recommend using the heat tools that I used for this piece on cotton — it will just burn. Synthetic materials work best for me. About Modena Air Dry Polymer Clay — it is fantastic to work with! Just make sure there are no little dust particles around your work area. The clay seems to be attracted to dusties.

4)alien pear

“alien pear”
devore, drawing w/pen & ink, embellishments

Cotton fabric
Devore’
Micron pen 01
Felt batting
Pearl Cotton embroidery floss #5 – red
Glass beads
Cotton thread – black
Polyester thread – red

I traced the pear design onto the fabric. Made little surrounding circles with the Devore to create holes so the black felt batting would show. Removed the Devore melted fabric with a wet toothbrush. Ironed the quilt top until it was dry. Placed the top over the batting and doodled on some accenting pen work. I added embellishments by stitching on some beadwork and embroidering a few x’s on the stem. The backing fabric was added.

Tips:  Use a lightbox to trace a design onto the fabric if the fabric is not sheer enough to see through or if you would rather not draw on your own. I used the sun by placing the fabric up on the window and tracing for most of the pear. It was not easy. I might invest in a lightbox. Also, if using Devore, follow the directions to the letter.

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